Brazilian Carnival

What Is Brazilian Carnival?

Brazilian Carnival

The Brazilian Carnival (Portuguese: Carnaval do Brasil, IPA: [kaʁnaˈvaw]) is an annual Brazilian festival held between the Friday afternoon before Ash Wednesday and Ash Wednesday at noon, which marks the beginning of Lent, the forty days before Easter. During Lent, Roman Catholics and some other Christians traditionally abstained from the consumption of meat and poultry, hence the term “carnival”, from Carnevale, “to remove (literally, “raise”) meat.”

Rhythm, participation, and costumes vary from one region of Brazil to another. In the southeastern cities of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, and Vitória, huge organized parades are led by samba schools. Those official parades are meant to be watched by the public, while minor parades (blocks) allowing public participation can be found in other cities, like Belo Horizonte, also in the southeastern region. The northeastern cities of Recife, Olinda, Salvador, and Porto Seguro have organized groups parading through streets, and the public interacts directly with them. This carnival is also influenced by African-Brazilian culture. It is a six-day party where crowds follow the trios elétricos through the city streets, dancing and singing. Also in the northeast, Olinda carnival features unique characteristics, heavily influenced by local folklore and cultural manifestations, such as Frevo and Maracatu.

Brazilian Carnival
Brazilian Carnival

Brazilian Carnival Orgy

During the countdown to WorldSkills São Paulo 2015, we’ll present and show a little bit of Brazilian culture and customs. In this article, you’ll learn more about one of the most traditional holidays and festivals in Brazil: Carnival.

As in the other parts of the world, the Brazilian Carnival occurs immediately before Lent; the main events are usually during February. The celebration has its origins in Portugal, where it began in the fifteenth century. During the colonization of Brazil, the Portuguese people brought the celebration with them, especially after the Portuguese Royal Family moved to Brazil, in 1808. At this stage, the city of Rio de Janeiro started to have his own celebration, mainly an aristocratic celebration, but slowly, the lower classes of society started to take ownership of Carnival. The early records of “Carnival de Rua” (Street Carnival) parties are in Rio de Janeiro.

Nowadays, you have plenty of options to enjoy the Carnival in Brazil. From the streets of Salvador and Recife to the Escola de Samba parades in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. Every city has its own characteristics and culture. In Salvador, thousands of fans gather together behind Trios Elétricos, large trucks with big sound systems, to sing and dance with famous Brazilian singers and bands. If in Recife, be sure to watch the street carnival go through the historic downtown area of Olinda and see the groups of Frevo, the local musical style.

History Of Carnival

Carnival began in the 1830s as a continuation of the Portuguese tradition of celebrating and indulging on the day before Lent begins. Lent is the 46-day period observed primarily by Roman Catholics as a means of sacrifice and abstinence in preparation for Easter. During the late 1800s, street musicians and dancing were introduced in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival, in addition to themed costumes and the tradition of electing the Carnival’s “king.” The celebration includes live music, street performances, dancing, floats, costumes, food, and beverages.

Carnival Brazilian Grill Sioux Falls

Rodizio service is the type of service we offer at Carnaval. Originating in Southern Brazil, most notably in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Gauchos serving meat & carving their meats table side has grown to become America’s favorite way to enjoy the excellent cuts of Beef, Pork, Chicken & Lamb that we offer. Guests visiting Carnaval Brazilian Grill start off by helping themselves to our Seasonal Fresh Salad Bar & Brazilian Style Hot Bar. A popular item on our Hot Bar is Feijoada, the national dish of Brazil, which is a time taking stew of black beans & meat served traditionally with rice.

Carnival Brazilian Grill Sioux Falls
Carnival Brazilian Grill Sioux Falls

Afterwards, you turn a token on your table to show the green side, which signals our Gaucho Chefs that you are ready for meat service! To take a break for a moment turn your token back to red, then back to green to get more meat service. Keep doing that until you’ve tried every skewer!

Brazilian Carnival Costumes

The exotic nature and sensuality of the samba are only enhanced by the flashy costumes of the participants. But these costumes are not chosen because of aesthetics but rather they form part of the story.

While the spectators only see the different pigments and designs of the costumes, the significance of each garb is not lost on the judges. That’s why the samba schools give particular attention to the type of costume they will display. The preparation and decision-making process takes months. Tracing the Carnival’s origins to the European masquerades, the visitors are also encouraged to bring their own costumes to feel the spirit of Carnival.

Carnival Brazilian

The unique characteristics of Brazilian Carnaval are rooted in a cultural clash between the Portuguese and the Africans. The whites brought the festival from Europe (Entrudo, an alternative name for Carnaval in Portuguese) and the blacks had their rhythms, music and dance moves.

Gradually the tradition was created to go once a year onto the streets to have a party together. Musical styles and other customs merged over time. Only in 1917, this culminated in the invention of the samba, very much a product of the mutual love for the music of the former colonists and the former slaves.

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